Marvelous Girl Has Moved!

Octomom used to boost fertility clinic’s success rate

Posted on: April 1, 2009

Nadya Suleman

Nadya Suleman

Beyond just the ethics of implanting excessive embryos during in-vitro fertilization (IVF), an investigation into the track record and success rates of the fertility doctor responsible for the recent birth of octuplets, sheds light on a controversial issue in the fertility community – claims on pregnancy and IVF success rates and what is actually behind the reported numbers.

Reports indicate that success rates at the clinic responsible for the octuplets were significantly below the national average, and that they were unable to treat patients over the age of 35. In order to increase conception odds, the doctor allegedly implanted six embryos, more than twice the recommended amount. Other fertility clinics are known to report above average success rates, yet place specific guidelines on the difficulty and type of patients they will accept. As a result, experts urge patients not to focus on numbers alone, as some statistics may be misleading.

Dr. John Rapisarda with Fertility Centers of Illinois – one of the nation’s leading infertility treatment centers – explains that physicians and clinics have different criteria that limit entry into their IVF programs; and that the more restrictive criteria leads to higher pregnancy rates, because only individuals with the best prognosis are eligible for treatment. “This may then limit access to services for some couples who are less likely to get pregnant, making it difficult to directly compare statistics between programs,” he adds.

While maintaining high success rates that are recognized throughout the nation, Fertility Centers of Illinois has earned a reputation for successfully treating challenging patients and overcoming hard-to-solve fertility issues. As a result, FCI encourages all patients to explore the following factors when selecting a physician and fertility treatment center:

1. High Order Multiples: Like the octuplets case, if a clinic reports an elevated number of high- order multiple births, it may suggest that the program is transferring more embryos in order to maintain a competitive success rate.

2. Success of Cryo-embryo Transfers: A high rate of success reflects an excellent embryology lab that can culture and store embryos and improve the overall cycle efficiency from a single retrieval. Ideally, success rates should be no more than 10-15% lower than fresh transfer rates.

3. Egg Donor Success Rates: Avoid a program with low egg donor success rates. This is a great equalizer as it is the most controlled group going through IVF. When trying to evaluate a program, it eliminates other variables such as different selection and cancellation criteria.

4. Size of Practice: A smaller practice often cannot offer all of the cutting edge services or perform them as well as a larger practice, where the physicians and embryologists continually face a larger variety of the most challenging cases that enable them to gain added expertise and maintain their skills.

5. Services Offered: For the absolute best chance at conception, ensure that the program offers all of the latest techniques, such as PGD (Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis) and Third Party Reproduction.

Advertisements

1 Response to "Octomom used to boost fertility clinic’s success rate"

Great entry. About this, “A smaller practice often cannot offer all of the cutting edge services or perform them as well as a larger practice, where the physicians and embryologists continually face a larger variety of the most challenging cases that enable them to gain added expertise and maintain their skills”, I found something at tubal-reversal.nett by Dr. Berger that it’s mostly true especially when the doctor isn’t much an expert of the procedure. Thanks for this entry!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog Stats

  • 657,727 hits

Top Clicks

  • None

Follow me on Twitter

%d bloggers like this: